Item #3921 [HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide. General Electric Corp.
[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide
[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide
[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide
[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide
[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide
"Now the computer takes over"

[HISTORY OF COMPUTING - 1965]. You and the Computer: A Student's Guide

Schenectady, New York: General Electric, 1965. Folio (11" by 8.5"). 19 numbered pages with in-text illustrations and reproductions of photographs. Stapled in original illustrated wrappers (trifle wear along spine, 1-inch line on front cover in ink, lower cover dust soiled). Very good. Item #3921

Vintage illustrated 1965 student's guide to computers and computing published by General Electric, no doubt issued in order to entice and recruit young talent: "The future clearly belongs to those who understand the computer. And, to a great extent, man's future progress depends on intelligent young people who are able to put the computer to work, solving our social, industrial, and scientific problems. As a major manufacturer of computers, and one of the nation's largest computer users, General Electric hopes that you, the student, will want to play an important role in the computer age -- your age" (p. 1).

The guide offers information about how computers work, what they are capable of, and how to best understand binary code and symbolic languages. Peppered throughout are cartoon illustrations intended to make the subject more approachable. Page 2 features photos of twelve young people (eight men and two women) who are integrating computers into their budding careers; notable are the two African-Americans (one male and one female).

We are reminded by the names of programming languages such as FORTRAN and COBAL (which we actually used in conjunction with punched cards). The depiction of "computer memory" (i.e. ferromagnetic ceramic "doughnuts") looks laughably primitive to us today. Our favorite image is on pp. 18-19: depicted is a clean-cut engineer gazing at room filled with computer hardware. Behold! The future!

Price: $250.00

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