El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848. Hesiquio . CURRIER IRIARTE, Nathaniel, lithographer and publisher, artist.
El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848
El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848
El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848
El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848
El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848
Hesiquio's famous lithograph reworked by Currier & Ives

El Fandango Mexicano, El Jarave / Mexican Fandango, 1848

New York: Lith. & Pub. by Currier, 152 Nassau St. Cor. of Spruce, 1848. Toned lithograph (signed "J.G." below image) with original hand coloring. Image: 20.7 x 31.9 cm; image and line border: 21.2 x 32.3 cm; image, border, and title: 32.1 x 32.3 cm; overall sheet size: 32.5 x 43.7 cm. At top blank margin offsetting from brown matte tape, lower left blank margin has small surface abrasion, scattered light marginal staining, overall good condition and fresh colors. Hinged matte. Original lithograph, NOT a reproduction! Very good. Item #3459

First American edition, published by Currier & Ives, of Iriarte’s original Mexican edition of the previous year. Hesiquio Iriarte (ca. 1820-1897?) was arguably the finest lithographer in nineteenth-century Mexico. This lively image reflects the humanity, sociability, indomitable spirit, and material culture of the Mexico we love. Remarkably, Irarte created this festive Fandango image at a time when Mexico was undergoing the horrors and tragedies of the Yanqui Invasion.

The scene presents a large, high-ceiling hall, teeming with crowd of happy revelers: drinking, preparing food, eating, playing music, waving hats, singing, and clapping hands. At the center a beautifully attired lady dancer daintily lifts her gorgeous skirt. Her handsome partner is dressed in full charro garb. The details of costume of the dancers and onlookers are extraordinary.

To the right of the two dancers stands another couple, likewise lavishly attired. The man is smoking, and behind him is another lady who is also smoking (!)

On the wall hang a lasso, bridle, and a sword. In the foreground is a cat hissing at an indifferent dog. At leaf are three musicians performing on harp, guitar, and a Mexican guitarron (a large, deep-bodied six-string acoustic bass).

This print is one of the few Mexican scenes published by the Currier & Ives firm that does not depict Mexican-American War scenes. It is a somewhat faithful reproduction of Iriarte’s original. It is interesting to speculate how Iriarte’s image came so quickly into the hands of Currier and Ives.

From the Dorothy Sloan Collection of Latin Americana.

Peters, Currier & Ives 584.

Price: $750.00