Autograph / clipped signature tipped onto portrait engraving. Lucretia Mott.
Autograph / clipped signature tipped onto portrait engraving
Autograph / clipped signature tipped onto portrait engraving
Autograph / clipped signature tipped onto portrait engraving

Autograph / clipped signature tipped onto portrait engraving

New York: G.E. Perine & Co. (engraver), 1880s. Engraving (160 x 103 mm) foxed; floated in frame slightly thicker paper, apparently extracted from a book judging from the left margin. Signature quite clear and unblemished. Very good. Item #3349

Fine signature Lucretia Mott (1793-1880), the formidable American abolitionist, social reformer, and women's rights activist. Judging from the handwriting, the present signature was written when she was elderly, perhaps from the 1860s, at which time she was a leading figure in both the abolition and suffrage movements. Indeed, Mott was one of the earliest suffragists in the United States, a catalyst for forming -- with Elizabeth Cady Stanton -- the first Women's Rights Convention (1848), the creation of which was occasioned in 1840 by the shameful refusal of the World Anti-Slavery Convention (London) to seat Mott and other women delegates from the U.S. Mott was not only the first president of the American Equal Rights Association, but was very active in the Underground Railroad, aiding a runaway slave to safe passage and freedom. As a Quaker pacifist, Mott abhorred the Civil War but was elated when slavery was overturned as a result of the North's victory

There is no question that the present signature is genuine, comparing exactly to that which appears below the portrait engraving of her in Susan B. Anthony's "History of Woman Suffrage" (Rochester: Susan B. Anthony, 1887 - opposite p. 369).

Price: $150.00

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