Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album. CB Radio / Amateur Radio / QSL Cards.
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album
Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album

Archive of 80 QSL Cards (1970s) preserved in contemporary Photo Album

V.p. 1970s. Large quarto photo album (30 cm): brightly floral-patterend cloth lettered in gilt. 10 card-stock "leaves" protected by plastic sheets, each "leaf" completely filled with 80 QSL cards, including some duplicates, plus 5 postcards. Card-stock rather yellowed and one plastic sheet creased and a bit ragged. Individual cards printed in various formats, including offset, mimeo, and typed (some stuck to card-stock, otherwise in good condition). Item #3225

Archive of Q-Code Cards: "I AM IN RECEIPT OF YOUR MESSAGE"

A large and colorful archive of amateur radio QSL cards used to confirm two-way radio communication, apparently all issued at the height of the colorful QSL trend of the 1970s. The cards hail from far and wide in both the United States and Canada--we note examples from Maine, Indiana, Wisconsin, Vermont, Washington state, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Oregon, Texas, Colorado, Minnesota, New Jersey, Idaho, Delaware, California, Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. While early QSL cards were fairly unimaginative, these almost all exude the operator's personality and interests, including religious, patriotic, raunchy, fortune telling, and military.

"CB radio enthusiasts often exchanged colorful QSL cards, especially during the height of CB's popularity in the 1970s. CB radio operators who met while on the air would typically swap personalized QSL cards which featured their names ("handles") and CB callsigns. A simple card format might only include the users callsign and/or "handle", home location, and note the date and time of a CB radio contact. More elaborate cards featured caricatures, cartoons, slogans and jokes, sometimes of a ribald nature. As the CB radio fad grew in the U.S. and Canada, a number of artists specializing in artwork for CB QSL cards emerged who were identified by nicknames such as "Alley Cat", "Sundown", "Booking Agent", "Squeaky", "The Viking", "Moonglow", and "Brushstroke".[14] According to artist Jess Anderson, aka "Runnin Bare", in 1976, he returned $100,000 to customers "because he could not keep up with demand".[14].

Price: $280.00