Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum. Jacques CUJAS.
Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum
Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum
Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum
Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum

Opera Iacobi Cuiacii i.c. quae de iure fecit in hunc diem, ab ipso auctore disposita et recognita, & aucta libro singulari Consultationum, & libr. XV. XVI. XVII. Obseruationum

Paris: Apud Sebastianum Niuellium, 1577. First Edition. Hardcover. Large folio: 3 volumes in one. 4 ff., 332 pp; 6 ff., 390 pp; 228 pp. BOUND IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CALF, richly blind-tooled, evidence of two pair of ties (binding worn, spine defective; damp staining to lower margins throughout). Provenance: early blind-stamps of the Theological Institute of Connecticut (now known as the Hartford Seminary). NB: in 1976 a collection of more than 200,000 books from the Hartford Seminary Library were sold to Emory University, including this one --> deaccessioned from Pitts Theology Library. Very good. Item #1091

¶ FIRST EDITION of the collected works of Cujas, "le fondateur de l'etude moderne du droit" (NBG), a "beautiful and exact [edition] now very scarce" of his monumental reappraisal of Roman Law (1911 Enc. Brit); the only edition published in his lifetime. Scarce in any condition; our copy, which is preserved in a contemporary French binding, is the only one currently on the market. * Cujas was a key figure in the establishment of modern jurisprudence, and the founder, with Alciat, of Renaissance legal studies. He was "le veritable fondateur de l'ecole historique du droit" (M. Lerminier, Introduction Generale a l'Histoire du Droit, Paris 1829, pp. 43-46). * By his exegesis of Latin texts, Cujas sought to place the Roman law in its historical context. Unlike previous scholars, he was relatively unconcerned with the practical applications of Roman law and wished primarily to study the ancient texts in their relation to history and literature. He is often considered the founder of the historical school of jurisprudence. Much of his critical effort was directed toward reconstructing in the original form the excerpts from eminent Roman jurists quoted in the Corpus Juris Civilis. * Cujas has long been considered the oracle of jurisconsults: few penetrated deeper into the understanding and explanation of the Roman laws, and fewer had a better command of the Latin language. His surpassing merit as a jurisconsult consisted in the fact that he turned from the ignorant commentators on Roman law to the Roman law itself. He consulted a very large number of manuscripts, of which he had collected more than 500 in his own library; In jurisprudence his study was far from being devoted solely to Justinian; he recovered and gave to the world a part of the Theodosian Code, with explanations; and he procured the manuscript of the Basilica, a Greek abridgment of Justinian, afterwards published by Fabrot. He also composed a commentary on the Consuetudines Feudorum, and on some books of the Decretals. In the Paratitla, or summaries which he made of the Digest, and particularly of the Code of Justinian, he condensed into short axioms the elementary principles of law, and gave definitions remarkable for their admirable clearness and precision. * Jacques Cujas was born in Toulouse in 1520. From modest beginnings, Cujas studied law in his hometown with Arnaud du Ferrier, having earned a solid reputation as a scholar of Justinian. In 1554 he was appointed professor of law at Cahors; he then went to Bourges in 1555. After two visits to Valencia, and then to Paris, in 1576, he returned to Bourges. The religious wars drove him out. He was called by the king to Paris, and permission was granted him by the parlement to lecture on civil law in the university there. A year later, he finally took up residence at Bourges, where he remained till his death in 1590, in spite of a handsome offer made him by pope Gregory XIII in 1584 to attract him to Bologna. * CONTENTS: Vol. I: Notae ad libros IIII Institutionum Dn. Justiniani. Vol. II: Paratitla in libros L Digestorum seu Pandectarum. Commentaria in Pandectarum. Vol. III: Ad Africanum tractatus IX. * This copy, like that of George Washington University, Berkeley Law Library, Tulane Law Library, and Mount Angel Abbey, does not contain Vols. IV (Commentarii ad tres postremos libros codicis Dn. Justiniani) and V (Observationum et emendationum libri XVII). * REFERENCES: Adams C3028 (2 copies only, both lacking volume IV-V). Not in Brunet, or Graesse; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 4.

Price: $2,250.00